Slides of the ODTUG Webinar: “Oracle ADF Immersion: How an Oracle Forms Developer Immersed Himself in the Oracle ADF World”

A few weeks ago we did an ODTUG Webinar: “Oracle ADF Immersion: How an Oracle Forms Developer Immersed Himself in the Oracle ADF World”.

About 186 followed the seminar online.
Those people received a link to the recorded session and the slides of the presentation.

For those who couldn’t attend, these are the slides of the presentation: ADF Immersion presentation
But the presentation was a lot more than a few slides, there was also a demo(>30 minutes).
So if you want to see the full recording, you can see all past webinars as a full ODTUG member.

If you need more info on ADF methodologies and ADF best practices or want to ask questions about these topics, check out the ADF EMG group.

Oracle Open World 2012 and ADF EMG

Indeed, it’s almost “that” time of the year again, the week that San Francisco will turn red and is full of Oracle people.
There so much to do, but I still have to build my agenda.

But there are already some things to schedule…
One day, one Moscone room, one main topic…ADF EMG Sunday.
A whole day of interesting presentations on ADF, kicking off with our own:

UGF3783 - Oracle ADF Immersion: How an Oracle Forms Developer Immersed Himself in the Oracle ADF World - 9am-10am Moscone South room 305

As I wrote in a previous blog post, we created an ADF course to introduce ADF to Forms/non-Java developers.
So if you’re a Forms developer or you don’t have any java experience and want to get introduced to ADF, this will be the right session to start.

You’ll find a nice overview on Chris Muir’s blog of the other ADF EMG sessions that day.

This one will be very interesting:
UGF10464 - Oracle Fusion Middleware Live Application Development Demo - 12:45-3:45pm Moscone South room 305

A three hour live demo by Lucas Jellema, Lonneke Dikmans and Duncan Mills.
Check this out!!!

OBUG Connect, the Oracle Benelux Usergroup conference in Brussels.

Opening ceremony by Wim Coekaerts & Janny Ekelson.
Nothing much to say about this…

First keynote session was brought by Chris Leone about Oracle Fusion applications.
Applications is not my thing, but it was nice to see how everything in Fusion apps is integrated like BI and collaboration.

My first session was “The best way” by Tom Kyte, a session about doing things the “best way” or “best practices”.
Tom quoted Bryn Llewellyn on what brings you to best practices.
It depends on things from “reasoning skills” over “education” to “know oracle inside out” to “know pl/sql inside out”.

An example join two big tables(big… big tables) with little distinct values.
What will be the fastest(best) way to retrieve records for one of those distinct values: hash joins or index scans?
In a batch operation the hash joins will be the fastest, but on a screen that only shows 20 records?

So, when is something the best way?  Well, it depends…

How can you tune using TKPROF?
A best practice…
Get the facts(physical I/O, logical I/O, difference between CPU and elapsed time,…).
Infer more facts.  Know your data, know how oracle works.
Build your context.
Rule things out.
Very interesting session!

Time for lunch!

Next session was one of Lucas Jellema and Patrick Stevens: “Randstad’s modernization of organization, architecture and applications powered by Fusion Middleware”.
They explained how they transformed the IT team to work with the agile approach.
This resulted in a faster develoment(about 4 times) and a team that is more involved.
Randstad also decided to make their applications service based.
So a service layer was build around all core processes using BPEL and OSB.
The only problem is Forms, which still accesses the database directly.
The Forms application will fade away in the future to a web application in ADF…

Last session was another AMIS session by Luc Bors together with Simon Vos of bol.com: “How BOL.COM benefited from ADF”.
Bol.com decided in 2007 to move to ADF.
Some reasons to move:
- Oracle statement of direction:  exit designer
- no authorization/authentication
- forms supported datamodel, not business processes
Where did they want to go to:
- SSO
- new and extended UI
- add reporting
- no direct database access

So they introduced scrum, ADF and trained they’re inhouse (forms)developers to use JDeveloper, ADF and JHeadstart.
Now they could start to rebuild the forms application in ADF.
The pl/sql and built-ins used in forms are put in the database or, if lucky, they could use an ADF alternative.
Others(little percentage) had to be programmed in Java.

This resulted in a new application with the same functionality(allthough some additional functionality was added) as the forms application with a new look and feel.

Some interesting sessions, allthough I like to see some more demos next time.

OOW 2010: Moving forms to ADF

When working with Oracle Forms these days and you’re not satisfied with the application anymore, there are some possibilities you can do:

  • upgrade
  • modernize
  • integrate
  • migrate

On our OOW session tomorrow(Oracle Forms in the Middle of Middleware, 1pm, Marriott Marquis Room: Salon 9), we will talk about the first three possibilities, upgrade, modernize and integrate.

But today I went to the session of Grant Ronald: Moving from Oracle Forms to Java and Oracle Application Development Framework
A session about migrating Oracle Forms to ADF.
The strategy of oracle is NOT desupporting Oracle Forms, on the contrary, they’re working on new features for 11g R2.

But when you consider migrating, do it for the right reasons.
Three kinds of reasons: the good, the bad and the ugly

Reasons to choose for migration can be

  • forms doesn’t meet the requirements anymore
  • there’s need for re-development
  • adopt leading edge, modern technologies

Reasons NOT to choose for migration:

  • there’s a heavy forms investment you don’t want to throw away
  • happy with data entry (and to my opinion forms is one of the best choices for data entry applications)

Wrong reasons:

  • forms will be desupported -> A clear answer of Grant Ronald: THIS IS NOT THE CASE!
  • upgrading your forms application will result in big problems
  • rewriting the application will save $$$

So migration is an option for your forms application, but Grant stated it several times in his session: DO IT FOR THE RIGHT REASON.

About migrating forms to ADF…
The technologies look similar…
Grant made a comparison between a dish washer and a washing machine.
Both have the same measurements, do similar things(wash something and dry it), etc.
But who puts his clothing in a dish washer?  Or cups and glasses in a washing machine?
So thechnologies look similar, but are different:

  • Java applet <> HTML/javascript
  • PL/SQL <> Java
  • Stateful <> stateless
  • No separation of UI and data elements <> seperate UI and data elements

Do not ignore those differences when looking at migration!

ADF is a framework and does a lot of things for you(like log on to the database, you don’t have to write the code) which is pretty nice.
But hey, Forms does also things for you, it’s also a framework.

You can build applications in ADF that look like forms application and have the same behaviour, but is that the reason to migrate, to work the same way?

When migrating there are some more challenges, eg reusability of table/views, procedures/functions, PLL, triggers.  What about forms built-in functions?

So, of course migration is an option for your Oracle Forms application, but ask yourself a question: Why migrate?
Take a look at all the options, before going to migrate.  It’s not an easy path to walk…

Check also the paper Grant wrote about migrating: Migrating Oracle Forms to Fusion: myth or magic bullet