Migrate to the Oracle Database Cloud Service

On the 6th of October the Oracle Cloud Day 2015 takes place in The Netherlands. iAdvise is proud to be a bronze sponsor on what promises to be a day filled with interesting sessions.

One of the main topics will be the Oracle Database Cloud service. In this blog post, which was published in the OGh Visie earlier this year, you can read what the Oracle Database Cloud Service is, which configuration possibilities there are and what steps are needed to migrate.

Oracle Database Cloud Service

Suppose you want to start with the Oracle Database Cloud Service tomorrow, what options are there? What services are there, and what do they do? Below you will find the 3 services available. In the future, Managed Database as a Service will be added to these services.

Database Schema Service

Interesting to know is that, already since 2012, you can use the Oracle Cloud, namely through the Oracle Database Cloud Schema Service (ODCSS).  It was – and still is- possible to get a database schema in the Oracle Cloud, on an 11g database that is fully managed by Oracle. You can connect to this schema through: SQL Developer, RESTful Web Services, Oracle Java Cloud or
Oracle APEX.oracle_database_cloud_scheme_service

However, there are some limitations. You have no SQL*Net access, so you can only use SQL Developer (or APEX) to connect to your cloud database schema. You can do this through a so-called “Cloud Connection”, but need to know that you can only browse and load/unload data. So, not really convenient for development purposes. In addition, you cannot “connect” multiple schemas with each other, and packages such as: utl_smtp, utl_ftp and features as VPD (Virtual Private Database) are not available.

If you don’t mind these limitations, ODCSS is a very budget-friendly solution. Starting at $175 per month, you have an Oracle database in the cloud with 5GB storage available

Virtual image

Are you looking for a cloud environment where you can install and manage your databases yourself, then the virtual image option might be something for you. You get a dedicated VM on which you can install an 11g or 12c database, either manually or through the Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA). Unlike with the ODCSS, you have SQL*net access and full access to the VM.

You get the choice whether you want to pay per hour or per month. From $400/month or $0,672/hour you can get started with SE 1.

Database as a Service

If you choose the Database as a Service, you have the same possibilities as with the virtual image option, but in addition you have a number of nice tools at your disposal. So you can create a database instance in 4 easy steps thanks to Oracle’s automatic provisioning system. In addition, you have a number of cloud tools to maintain and monitor your database very easily.

You can start with the Database as a Service for a SE1 database from $600/month or $1,008/hour.

Setting Up the Oracle Cloud Database as a Service

Database instance

For the creation of an Oracle database you have a simple wizard. This initiates the automatic provisioning of your database.  The provisioning ensures that your database is installed with cloud tooling technology and it configures the backup facilities.


The 4 steps that you must follow are:

  1. Choose your service: Virtual image or Oracle Database Cloud Service
    How do you want to pay: hourly or monthly?
  2. Choose your database version: 11gR2 or 12c?
  3. Choose your edition: SE1, EE, EE High performance, EE Extreme performance
  4. Choose the name of your instance, your compute shape (number of CPUs) and connect an SSH key to access to your VM.  Set a number of database configurations: how much storage you need, SID, and – in the future also a possible – a fail over database. If you also choose for Backup and Recovery, you select the storage container here.
    Then simply confirm, and you’re done! Fifteen minutes later you have a fully functioning database instance in the Oracle Cloud and access to a dedicated VM.


Backup & Recovery

When you choose the Oracle Cloud Database as a Service, you also have the necessary cloud tooling technology to simply set up the desired backup options.

If you’re only interested in a local backup, then the block store only option will do. During the provisioning of the VM, some additional disk space will be configured for the backup, by default 1.7 times the required database data volume. Through a combination of the familiar Oracle RMAN and classic system management tools, nicely packaged in a command line API, not only your database but also important system files are added to the local backup.

If you want full protection for your VM, then your best option is to choose the block store and cloud storage option. This option presupposes that Oracle Cloud Storage as a Service is purchased and configured. With a few simple commands, you will then be able to restore your full VM instance, including system files and configured Oracle database, into a new VM.

Both systems follow a series of Oracle’s best-practice guidelines and can be expanded and adapted to suit your needs.

Do you want your on-premise Oracle database(s) or Oracle database(s) that were created in an Oracle Cloud Database – Virtual image instance, also to be backed up in the Oracle Cloud, then you can set this up via the Oracle Cloud Backup as a Service. This service only relates to the storage of Oracle database backups. Do you also want to back up other types of data in the Oracle Cloud – for example, important system files – then you can do the setup through the Oracle Cloud Storage as a Service. In that case you are responsible for setting up the necessary backup policy.

Access rules

Who has which access to the Oracle Cloud Database as a Service?

Each Compute Cloud Service VM, child to the Oracle Cloud Database as a Service, is shielded from the angry world through so-called access rules. These are firewall rules that check the access to the VM specific protocols, such as HTTP(S), SSH or SQL * Net access. In these rules you define what source groups of VMs (network groups) or lists of IP addresses on a specific protocol may connect within a certain target group of VM(s).

When creating an Oracle Cloud Database as a Service instance, by default, 7 Oracle Compute Cloud Service access rules are created. These access rules control access to SSH (port 22), Enterprise Manager Database Control (port 1158), Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c (port 5500), Database listener (port 1521), Glassfish Server admin console (port 4848), HTTP (port 80) and HTTPS (port 443). The last one is necessary for accessing the Oracle REST Data Services, Oracle APEX and Oracle Cloud on-instance database monitor.

Only the SSH access is standard enabled. The other access rules must be explicitly enabled after creation.


Migrate to the Oracle Cloud

Have you decided to use the Oracle Database Cloud Service? Nice, but now you probably want to know what steps are needed to get your current on-premise environment in the cloud. And that happens to be one of the strengths of the Oracle Cloud: because you have full access to your dedicated cloud VM, you can tackle the migration in different ways.

For the migration of OraEvents (an application we build for Oracle) we used the classical method: an Oracle Data Pump export (expdp) of the on-premise database and an import (impdp) into the cloud database. The steps we went through are:

  • Expdp of the database schema
  • Copy the expdp DATA_PUMP_DIR directory to the Oracle database
  • Preparing the database – create new tablespaces, user schemas and assign the necessary rights
  • Import the expdp into the new database schema
  • Export and import of APEX workspace and applications
  • Copy the APEX images in the default DocumentRoot of the Glassfish server running the ORDS
  • Ready for testing!


If you decide to migrate to the Oracle Cloud today, you have a range of options available to ensure that your cloud database is more than just a replacement for you on-premise database. The automatic provisioning, powerful cloud tooling and integrated systems offer a great extra value. Because migrating to the cloud is very similar to a classic migration, there are no major objections from a technical perspective. The Oracle Cloud is ready. Now, it’s up to us!

Bryxx has launched!

On Tuesday, May 7 the Bryxx launch event took place. In the beautiful setting of the Flandria boat, and in the presence of a large number of customers, we revealed the services of this new venture. As a joint venture between the iAdvise and Contribute infrastructure teams, Bryxx will specifically focus on the middleware field.
In bringing together both expert middleware teams, we will focus on
  • Opening up your business critical web applications to your intranet or to the internet
  • Making sure that these applications, deployed on your middleware stack, are secure on all layers of the underlying architecture. Security from-data-to-browser
  • Streamlining and automating your process of development towards production
  • Providing you with the opportunities to outsource the maintenance of your private middleware cloud or to outsource your entire private middleware cloud
From a technical point of view Bryxx will dedicate its expertise to 4 domains:
  • Oracle Cloud Application Foundation (with web logic as the main driver)
  • Oracle Identity & Access management
  • Oracle Database Security
  • DevOps
With respect to these 4 areas of expertise, Bryxx provides strong consultancy profiles on all levels (pre-sales, infrastructure architects, senior implementation engineers, etc) to design, install, configure, maintain and monitor your middleware platform as well as to streamline the process of application development towards your preferred middleware solution.
When you add our managed services and hosted solutions offering on each of these domains to this package, with strong partnerships in the backend, we believe Bryxx has a strong and complete offering for all your middleware challenges !Our team of 14 dedicated and experienced middleware engineers is ready for you.
Want to know more?
Visit us at www.bryxx.eu or contact us at info@bryxx.eu

Why should you attend Oracle OpenXperience on 25 October in Brussels?

Because it’s there that you’ll find out how your organisation can benefit from Oracle’s new technologies!

Are mobility and the cloud opportunities for your organization or threats to its security?

Can applicationshardware and software really work together?

Is Oracle 12c a sensible investment?

Is drowning in (big) data unavoidable?

How can business intelligence become an integral part of IT structure?

If at least one of these questions rings a bell, you should attend Oracle OpenXperience. It’s where 10 of Oracle’s most valued partners will present their (local) views on today’s IT challenges and Oracle’s solutions for tackling them. It’s where you’ll discover the practical approach of our partners, in 12 sessions divided into 3 distinct tracks.

For the bigger picture, don’t miss the keynote sessions. Mario Derba, Regional Vice President Systems Sales, South Europe, will share his insight on Oracle’s worldwide strategy. After lunch, famous Belgian innovator, consultant and strategic influencer Jo Caudron will talk about current trends and how they affect IT and your business.

The Event Lounge
Generaal Wahislaan/Boulevard Général Wahis 16/F
1030 Brussels

Thursday 25 October 2012

Register here

Oracle Open World – Larry’s keynote: some announcements

Larry talks first about Fusion Apps.
After a controlled test period, it’s now officially available.

And now for really the first announcement…
Larry Ellison: “Everybody has a cloud, we too need a cloud”
So here it is Oracle Public Could.
Great to see Apex is strongly supported.

You can move your application and data from your datacenter to the cloud and back without a problem.
The Oracle Cloud is based on industry standards(Java, XML, Web services,…).
Pricing is based on monthly subscription, and that’s all, no extra licenses.

A second announcement: Oracle Social Network.
Collaborate, share, application integration, BI Navigation, …
He even gave a live demo of the Oracle Social Network.